why thyrst beauty products are for ALL skin tones

Written by
Allyson Welch

why thyrst beauty products are for ALL skin tones

Written by
Allyson Welch

why thyrst beauty products are for ALL skin tones

Why are Thyrst Beauty products great for all skin tones? First of all, it was formulated for EVERYONE.  The product line does not discriminate against any skin tone or color, and furthermore, skin type.  There are many products that are formulated for specific skin types, tones, and conditions; however, generally speaking, there are more products out on the market that do not apply to all skin tones [and they may be advertised like they are]. Below is a list of toxic ingredients that should not be used in personal care products and how we have combated that with a healthy alternative that can be used for ALL skin tones.


Hydroquinone- This ingredient lightens the complexion by decreasing the formation of melanin in order to depigment dark spots.  It essentially bleaches the skin which would be detrimental for dark skin tones.  Not only do products containing this ingredient advertise that we should chemically “lighten” our skin but, unbeknownst to the consumer, it contains exposure to mercury which is associated with neurotoxicity and kidney damage especially when used without professional advice.  Women of color are especially susceptible to this since they have been exposed repeatedly to the message that their skin should and could be lighter. 

Thyrst Beauty Alternative- We used Tomato Extract and Vitamin C as well as fruit enzymes such as Bromelain (pineapple) and Papain (papaya) for brightening the skin’s natural skin tone (not to lighten or bleach it).  We also used special alpha hydroxy acids to provide a smoother and brighter complexion that glows. 


(Synthetic) Fragrance- Cosmetic and personal care giant Procter & Gamble (P&G ) data shows that 22.5% of black women choose a product based on fragrance[1], and that it is also an important aspect for both Latina and Latino customers[2]. A commonly used ingredient in fragrance is Diethyl Phthalate (DEP), and information gathered by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) shows that black women and Hispanic women have much higher rates of DEP in their urine (almost double!) than white and Asian women[3]. Some of the ingredients used in these formulas for fragrance mimic the hormone estrogen and are associated with harmful thyroid effects. Phthalates are chemicals often found in cosmetic and personal care products that are linked to endocrine disruption, developmental and reproductive toxicity, and even cancer. It often shows up on the ingredients list in the form of a very ubiquitous word “fragrance.”

Thyrst Beauty Alternative- There are absolutely zero phthalates in any of the formulas.  Instead, we have used essential oils for fragrance. The entire line contains a proprietary combination of grapefruit lavender and some lemongrass. 


Parabens- Hormone disruptors.  Even small exposures to toxic chemicals during critical periods of development (such as pregnancy) can trigger adverse health consequences (such as impacts on fertility and pregnancy, neurodevelopment, and cancer)[4]. Because of a difference in the number of personal care products used daily — black women on average purchase nine times more beauty products than white women — the potential harm of these toxic ingredients is multiplied.

Thyrst Beauty Alternative- The line is completely paraben free and instead we use all natural preservatives to maintain shelf life while keeping all of our customers safe and healthy. 


[1] Jeffries, N. (2012, January 20). GCI Magazine. Retrieved February 13, 2015, from http://www.gcimagazine.com/networking/coverage/137786783.html?page=2

[2] Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals. (2015, February 1). Retrieved February 24, 2015, from http://www.cdc.gov/biomonitoring/pdf/FourthReport_UpdatedTables_Feb2015.pdf

[3] http://www.safecosmetics.org/get-the-facts/whats-in-my-products/people/women-of-color/#_ftn9

[4] https://www.ajog.org/article/S0002-9378(17)30862-1/fulltext